Massaro House - Frank Lloyd Wright´s posthumous work


 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

The Massaro House long building, similar to a yacht, anchored off a rocky island in the Mahopac lake in upstate New York. Its silhouette is projected upon the water in long horizontal lines; concrete, glass, stone and copper blend surprisingly well with the surrounding natural landscape. This house, projected by the famous American architect Frank Lloyd Wright over 50 years ago, was finally built in 2005.

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

When Joe and Barbara Massaro bought the land, years ago, they noticed there already was a project done by Wright in the 1950s for the previous owner. The project didn't have much information, just a few rough sketches, among which there was a plan, a cut and the façade; no indications for the construction, no details whatsoever. Still, from the little they saw, the Massaro's were impressed and convinced that they wanted to build their house according to Wright's project.

They hired architect Thomas A. Heinz, that, for many years, had studied and been responsible for many restaurations of Wright's works and that, through scarce available information, was able to produce a complete project, as faithful as possible to the original idea. It was, mostly, a variation from the concepts used in Usonian Houses and the famous Falling Water, with which it has remarkable similarities.

Regardless of the innate qualities of the house that has now been built and the valuable History lesson that this "time travel" gave, there are other important issues at hand here. The most evident one is the sense that building a project designed 55 years ago makes, in a totally different context. It's like, in a radical perspective, if we built, today, a Greek temple... That's the only way of understanding why, instead of being a ravishing and innovative work (as Wright's work was indubitably, in his time), the end result seems pathetic and out-of-place.

Wright, certainly, wouldn't agree. We hope he is turning over in his grave...

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

 Architecture Architects House Frank Lloyd Wright Massaro House Thomas Heinz

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