Brawl scenes and rare violence #2



 Brawl Cartoons Comic Drawing Fight Strip Violence

The more detailed the characters are the more interesting the fight becomes, because, not only are we sure they're not hurt, but the drawings become more expressive. If brawls among cowboys have become a cinema classic, Lucky Luke's violent stories are a comics cornerstone, and its author Morris is able to capture, matchlessly, the heated fights, complete with punches, black eyes, shattered glass, flying furniture... You can almost hear the noise.

 Brawl Cartoons Comic Drawing Fight Strip Violence

 Brawl Cartoons Comic Drawing Fight Strip Violence

Hergé's pudency made him avoid violent scenes. So fights in Tintin are rare and the cartoonist prefers to reduce them to a mere punch or camuflage them behind a cloud of dust... An exception is this strip from Le secret de la Licorne where the irritable captain Haddock plays his ancestor François de Hadoque to explain his friend Tintin how he beat pirate Rackham le Rouge.

 Brawl Cartoons Comic Drawing Fight Strip Violence

 Brawl Cartoons Comic Drawing Fight Strip Violence

The rows in Gaston Lagaffe have, as their sole trigger, his screw-ups, that push his co-workers into such despair to the point where they attack him savagely, or, at least, try to immobilise him so that he won't repeat his mistakes. When hit by one of Gaston's creations, even the peaceful Bertje or the meticulous Prunelle watch ferocious killer instincts grow inside them...

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