The surreal faces of Iain macarthur



Iain macarthur

Some people spend their entire lives without knowing what they really want. Work is a hard task to be accomplished day after day, and satisfaction comes on Saturday, after the working hours, and goes aways on Sunday evening, when they realize that Monday is coming.

But there are also "the lucky ones". The British Iain Macarthur knew exactly what he wanted for life when he was eight years old. Probably, as the major part of the boys of his age was thinking about playing. Ok, he also did it; however, scrawling books and the school table was so much more profitable to him -- and it is until these days.

Iain became fascinated for art watching comics. Well, there's no surprise on it, as the major part of the boys of this age share the same passion; nevertheless, for him, Batman series -- the first comics he saw -- was more than pastime and, since then, Iain dived deep inside his imagination, his drawings and his characters. Then, he joined artistic predisposition to professionalism.

Iain macarthur

At his illustrations, details have life and voice. They're works inside works. Looking the final result, you can easily get lost through so many minute lines. On a glance it is something remarkable -- on a deep appreciation, the particularities become his art a piece of high value. And many of Iain's work were born from strange faces in the street. Unknown people are transformed into surreal faces.

He always carries a notebook with him. A bus journey or going to a coffee-house can result in new works. Comics keep inspiring him and, with this range, are also street art, traditional tattoos and many textile stamp models. By now, Alphonse Mucha and Klimt also provide him some sketches.

Distinction, antagonism... His creations result in uncommon portraits of people composed with geometric shapes and effects; all with many lines and textures, using, in most of the cases, aquarelle and pigment pens. "I create portraits of ordinary people but create them in a unusual way by, embellishing patterns and watercolour effects into the portrait to give a vivid explosion effect--transforming their faces from something plain to something entirely bizarre and wonderful at the same time. " It's surreal.

Iain macarthur

Iain macarthur

Iain macarthur

Iain macarthur

Iain macarthur

Iain Macarthur

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